Höhlen (caves)

Agnes Milowka +26.02.2011

Schreckliche Neuigkeiten aus Australien, Agnes Milowka ist letzten Samstag von einem Tauchgang in Tank Cave nicht mehr zurück gekommen.

Ihr Körper wurde gestern ca. 600m entfernt vom Eingang lokalisiert und ihre Freunde werden versuchen sie heute am Montag in Zusammenarbeit mit der örtlichen Polizei zu bergen.

Alles Gute Ag, ich hoffe Du kannst jetzt mit Deinem Freund Wes die Höhlen im Jenseits betauchen.

Terrible news from Australia. Agnes Milowka disappeared in Tank Cave last Saturday.

Her body was located 600m from the entrance yesterday and her fellow cave divers will try to get her out today.

Goodspeed Ag, I really hope you´re diving the caves in heaven together with your bro Wes

Divers search for body in underwater cave

Updated Sun Feb 27, 2011 11:27pm AEDT

Underwater cave: the diver went missing in Tank Cave, near Mount Gambier.

Underwater cave: the diver went missing in Tank Cave, near Mount Gambier. (7pm TV News SA)

A 29-year-old female diver is presumed dead after she went missing in Tank Cave, near Mount Gambier in South Australia’s south-east.

Fellow divers reported the Victorian woman missing earlier this afternoon.

Superintendent Trevor Twilley from the Limestone Coast Police says trained divers have joined the search for the missing diver.

„Apparently you have to have special qualifications and a ticket to be able to dive in that cave because of the complexities and nature of the cave itself,“ he said.

„Our water operations divers don’t have those qualifications so we’re working very closely with the Cave Diving Association of Australia to see what kind of assistance they can provide us.“

Rob Dycer owns the 270-acre property and leases the underwater cave to the Cave Divers Association.

„They go in there every second week roughly, so roughly about 26 times a year,“ he said.

„These people are the uttermost professionals. They are very, very good at their job.“

Tags: disasters-and-accidents, emergency-incidents, australia, sa, mount-gambier-5290

First posted Sun Feb 27, 2011 6:52pm AEDT

Cave diver Agnes Milowka dies in South-East

  • Ken McGregor Doug Robertson
  • From: AAP
  • February 28, 2011 2:51PM
agnes milowka

It could be days before the body of Agnes Milowka, pictured in photos from her website, is recovered from an underwater cave near Mt Gambier. Source: Supplied

Agnes Milowka

Cave diver Agnes Milowka explores underwater terrain in the Bahamas. Pic: Wesley C. Skiles Source: AdelaideNow

Agnes Milowka

Agnes Milowka at the site of a cave dive. Pic: Agnes Milowka Source: AdelaideNow

cave

Divers and emergency services workers gather at Tank Cave. Picture: Lechelle Earl Source: The Advertiser

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Free Spirit

Internationally-renowned cave diver Agnes Milowka made this video before she drowned yesterday near Mt Gambier.

Adelaide Now28 February 2011

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A MELBOURNE cave diver who died yesterday was a passionate expert who „couldn’t wait to get underground“.

Polish born Agnes Milowka, 29, was a „world renowned“ diver who had explored caves from Tasmania to the Bahamas.

In Sanctum, which is now showing at cinemas across Australia, Ms Milowka was a stunt diver for the two female characters in the movie.

In a horrific twist of irony, the movie centres around a group of cave divers who are pushed to the limit when an expedition goes tragically wrong.

Ms Milowka graduated from Flinders University with a diploma in Maritime Archaeology in 2007, but has since spent time diving in Florida and was based in Melbourne.

During her short but distinguished career she worked for both National Geographic and the Discovery Channel.

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Ms Milowka’s body was found in Tank Cave, a seven-kilometre cave near Mt Gambier in South Australia’s southeast.

She was one of a group of Victorian divers visiting for the weekend.

SA Police Water Operation Divers are assisting the retrieval operation but the police divers did not have sufficient cave diving experience to recover the body, Superintendent Trevor Twilley said.

„It’s an extremely dangerous job and that’s why we have to tread with caution and make sure we don’t put the cave divers (rescuers) at risk,“ he said.

„It’s one thing to be able to get to (Ms Milowka) but the divers have to be able to get back safely with the body.

„The (divers) are all volunteers and they’re very upset because they’re a close-knit community. At the moment we’re working on getting counselling for them.“

Supt Twilley said it was too early to comment on what went wrong on the dive in a cave Ms Milowka had experienced many times previously.

„At this stage it’s too early to tell and we probably won’t know until we recover the diver and also the equipment then that will be analysed,“ he said.

„This dive (to video the route to the body) will take about three hours (but) the whole operation could take three days.“

On her website, Ms Milowka says she was well aware of the risks she faces everytime she submerged into the dark subterranean world of cave diving.

„It would be difficult to claim that caves are completely safe“ she says.

„Going into caves in general carries a certain amount of risk, and then if you add water and submerge the cave then obviously the risks increase.“

Tank Cave has been described by dive experts as „the best cave in the southern hemisphere“.

It is on private property on the Princes Highway, halfway between Millicent and Mt Gambier, near Tantanoola, and is renowned for being a „complicated underground cavern“, according to local diving information.

Ms Milowka’s body was about 500m from the cave entrance.

It is the second cave diving death in the South-East in the past year. Melbourne doctor Robert McAlister, 51, died while diving in a sinkhole near Mt Schank on March 13, 2010.

His co-diver was gradually surfacing to avoid the bends when he saw Dr McAlister, an experienced diver, at a great depth below him, authorities said.

The co-diver did not have enough air to return to Dr McAlister. He came to the surface and raised the alarm, but when water operations police found Dr McAlister he was dead and was tangled in the cave’s guide ropes.

Police divers have begun the grim task of recovering the body of a Melbourne woman who died in an accident in Australia’s longest underwater cave system yesterday.

Agnes Milowka had dived many times previously in Tank Cave near Mount Gambier in South Australia, exploring and mapping its unknown passages.

The 29-year-old was well-known in diving circles both in Australia and around the world, and had worked as a stunt diver on James Cameron’s 3D diving film Sanctum.

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Agnes Milowka, as she appeared in a video she posted on Youtube.Agnes Milowka, as she appeared in a video she posted on Youtube.

On Friday, she tweeted of her excitement about her impending diving trip to South Australia.

„Another w-end of cave diving in Mt Gambier … fabulous! Can’t wait to get underground,“ she wrote.

Police are still trying to piece together what went wrong in Tank Cave, a maze-like system with more than seven kilometres of underwater passages.

At some time during yesterday’s dive, with a group from Victoria, she was believed to have left her buddy, and never returned.

Her fellow divers reported her missing at 1.45pm, with one able to identify an area within the cave system where Ms Milowka was last seen.

Her body was found overnight about 600 metres inside the cave system.

Officers have now sealed off the sinkhole and are devising a plan to retrieve the body.

In an article published on her website in November, Ms Milowka wrote of her experiences in Tank Cave, describing it as „a spiderweb gone wild“ and „unlike any other in the Mt Gambier region, it is a real gem and it is a joy to dive“.

„The cave is stunning, it is relatively shallow (a max depth around 20m), there is no flow to fight and the water is crystal clear – you can’t go wrong really,“ she wrote.

She also wrote of a new passage in Tank Cave she had discovered with a colleague, and described numerous „tight bits“ where some divers may have had to take off their tanks to squeeze through.

„The walls and roof to begin with are quite soft and squishy, which means that large chunks of the roof rain down on you as you exhale and the visibility is quickly reduced to zero,“ she wrote.

„This is not only a hazard when coming back out through the small restrictions but it also means that this section of the cave is particularly fragile and needs to be handled with a bit of tender love and care.“

She also said she would continue to explore the unmapped tunnels and passages in Tank Cave, which was „top of my list when heading over to Mt Gambier“.

Ms Milowka is believed to have attended Caulfield Grammar School in Melbourne, before completing a Graduate Diploma in Maritime Archaeology at Flinders University.

Her website says she holds the current female penetration record for diving in Australia, and had dived extensively in Florida in the US.

Last year she was part of a National Geographic Team on a project to the Blue Holes of the Bahamas and worked as a stunt diver on the 3D cave diving feature film Sanctum.

Superintendent Trevor Twilley from the Limestone Coast police says police won’t know what went wrong in Tank Cave until they recover and test Ms Milowka’s equipment and diving umbilical cords.

He said cave divers are helping police plan the recovery today because of the complexities of the almost eight-kilometre stretch of twisting underwater passages.

Police divers will join members of the tight-knit Cave Divers Association of Australia today to assess how to retrieve Ms Milowka’s body.

The planned dive is expected to take up to three hours, before the situation will be reassessed.

Superintendent Twilley said the association’s members, despite mourning the loss of their colleague, would help guide police through the complex, narrow system.

„That is something we have certainly discussed at length this morning – the emotional side of asking them to do that and particularly when they do reach the deceased what impact that may have on their emotions and what risk that may add to their safety,“ he told ABC radio in Adelaide.

The cave is located on private property on the Princes Highway near Tantanoola, with access to the cave controlled by the Cave Divers Association of Australia.

The woman is the second Victorian to die in cave diving accidents in south-east South Australia in the past year.

In March last year, Melbourne doctor Robert McAlister died in a sinkhole at Mount Schank near Mount Gambier.

The 51-year-old was diving with a friend when he is believed to have become tangled in a rope. His friend tried to free him as both ran low on air, however he was unable to be saved.

The Cave Divers Association of Australia has been contacted for comment.

Speaking to the Knox Weekly newspaper four days before her disappearance, Ms Milowka spoke of her passion for exploring.

„In this day and age when you think that everything has been found and you don’t even have to get off your chair to see the world, it’s amazing to think there are still places human eyes have never seen before,“ she said.

„It’s a phenomal feeling – the rush, the thrill of exploration, it totally hooked me.“

Reflecting on the dangers of cave diving, she said she had experienced many close calls.

„Everything that could posibly go wrong for me has.

„I’ve been stuck in stupid places trying to push the envelope a bit, but when that happens you have three choices. You can panic and die, give up and die, or control your thoughts, feelings and emotions and give yourself the best chance of coming out alive.“

She also spoke of her work on Sanctum, released this year.

„It sounds glamorous but it was very hard work,“ she said.

„We worked very hard. There were 12-hour days, night shifts and it was quite challenging – but I loved it.

„Seeing the process of making a movie and watching the end product was just a fantastic experience.

„Because the movie was so full-on, I thought my grandparents may panic a bit. After they saw it, they said they were scared to death for me, but proud.“

Diver’s body recovered from caves

Updated 8 hours 34 minutes ago

The body of a world-renowned cave diver has been recovered from the underwater channels where she had been trapped since Sunday.

Agnes Milowka, 29, ran out of air after becoming separated from her diving buddy in the eight kilometre-long channel system of Tank Cave near Mount Gambier in South Australia’s south-east.

Tank Cave is one of Australia’s longest underwater caves.

Divers had been working to shift rocks to clear a path so they could recover Ms Milowka’s body.

Superintendent Trevor Twilley says the diver’s friends, who were involved in the retrieval process, had an extremely difficult task.

„It has been an extremely long ordeal, particularly for the divers themselves,“ he said.

„I can’t help but feel sorry for them – the emotions they’re going through. And whilst it is a relief for them, I think the reality of what’s happened will probably hit them later on tonight and tomorrow as well.“

Ms Milowka believed cave diving was the essence of exploration and knew the risks, but said on her website the rewards were worth it.

ABC/AAP

Montag, Februar 28th, 2011 Höhlen (caves) 28 Comments

Ruth Spring

Ruth Spring, benannt nach Ruth Walker ist eine kleine sidemount Höhle in der Nähe von High Springs.

Cindy, Jean und Fred gaben mir die Möglichkeit sie zu betauchen. Leider waren die Sichtverhältnisse eher suboptimal und nach ein paar anfänglichen Schnellschüssen musste ich die Kamera wegklippen.

Irgendwie klappt die Sortierung nicht, das wird noch geändert

Some photos of Ruth (Walker) Spring, which is located close to High Springs. It´s a pretty sidemount cave, but the day we visited it, the viz was not the best.

(pics are out of order, but I´m working on that)

Sonntag, Januar 9th, 2011 Höhlen (caves) 3 Comments

Buch Side Mount Profiles von Jill Heinerth und Brian Kakuk

Endlich  hab ich es vorliegen, Jill´s und Brian´s druckfrisches neues Buch über Sidemount

Die beiden Explorer tauchen seit Jahren fast ausschließlich in dieser Konfiguration und sind weltweit als Experten auf diesem Gebiet anerkannt!

Jill als Weltrekordhalter und Pionier des techn. Tauchens war schon fast überall auf der Welt tauchen und dokumentiert dies professionell mit Videos und Fotos, sei es für den National Geographic oder Hollywood. Ihr persönliches Anliegen ist allerdings mit den Dokumentationen auch das Umweltbewußtsein, insbesondere für unsern größten Schatz, das Wasser zu wecken.

Mehr Details gibt es unter:

http://www.IntoThe Planet.com

http://www.RebreatherPro.com

Brian begann 1990 mit dem Höhlentauchen auf Bahamas, nachdem er Jahre lang als US Navy Taucher an nuclear betriebenen U-Booten, Flugzeuträgern und anderen militärischen Missionen beteiligt war.

Details:

http://www.bahamasunderground.com

http://www.bahamascaves.com

Auf 148 Seiten werden detailliert Entwicklung, verschiedene Arten, Ausrüstungskonfiguration und verschiedene Anwendungsgebiete mit Fotos beschrieben.

Am Ende kommen noch verschiedene Experten wie Steve Bogaerts (Razor), Lamar Hires (Nomad), Jakub Rehacek (Armadillo) und Wes Skiles zu Wort.

Eine sehr interessante Lektüre, die viele Möglichkeiten dieser Konfiguration aufzeigt, die individuelle Umsetzung allerdings bleibt jedem einzelnen Anwender, bezogen auf den jeweiligen Einsatzzweck überlassen.

Hier noch kurz eine Inhaltsübersicht:

table of content

-introduction

-history

-getting started

-gear styles

-gear configuration

-gas management

-open water side mount

-side mount cave diving

-advanced side mount diving

-sump diving

-profiles

-conclusions

Da ich Jill persönlich kenne, gab sie mir die Möglichkeit, dieses Buch und ihre anderen Bücher zu einem reduzierten Preis zu erwerben.

Jill ist eine Freundin und ich habe KEIN finanzielles Interesse am Verkauf! Aus diesem Grund bin ich bereit den Sonderpreis komplett weiter zu geben. Hinzu kommen allerdings noch die Versandkosten und Zoll aus USA sowie die individuellen Portokosten hier in Deutschland. welche aber mit Sicherheit bei einer Sammelbestellung geringer als bei meiner Einzelbestellung ausfallen werden.

Hier die Sonderpreise für die Bücher:

Titel:                                                                       Originalpreis:                 Sonderpreis

Side Mount Profiles                                                 49.95$                            39,95$

The Essentials of Cave Diving                             49,95$                            39,95$

Digital Underwater Photography                     24,95$                             18,95$

Ausserdem lässt sich mit Sicherheit auch eine Widmung einrichten, falls gewünscht!

Bei Interesse mailt mich an, über „Kontakt“ oder tc.feiden@t-online.de

Ich habe mal die Kosten überschlagen.

Zoll fällt keiner an, Einfuhr/Umsatzsteuer liegt bei 7%. Dazu kommen noch die Versandkosten aus USA, die auf alle umgelegt werden und die Versandkosten hier in Deutschland.

Im Endeffekt werden die Kosten für die beiden teureren Bücher jeweils unter 40Euro liegen. Allen Interessierten werden die genauen Kosten vor Bestellung natürlich mitgeteilt.

Dienstag, Oktober 26th, 2010 Allgemeines, Höhlen (caves) 2 Comments

Pozo Azul, Weltrekord Höhlentauchgang / world record cave dive

 Ein von Briten geführtes Tauchteam hat in Pozo Azul, einer Höhle in Spanien einen neuen Weltrekord aufgestellt.

Jason Mallinson, Rick Stanton, John Volanthen, alles Briten und der Holländer Rene Houben unternahmen, unterstützt von Tauchern aus Spanien, Holland und Großbritanien diesen beachtenswerten Vorstoß.

Pozo Azul ist ein Sump, d.h. man findet hier mehrere luftgefüllte Kammern, in denen man auftauchen kann. Die vier erreichten mit ihren Scootern nach 5,5h die zweite Kammer namens Tipperary (benannt nach dem bekannten WW I Lied: It´s a long way to Tipperary), 5160m entfernt vom Eingang.

Hier schlugen sie ihr Lager auf, wobei Sauerstoff und Kohlendioxid-Gehalt der Luft ständig überprüft wurden. Am nächsten Tag begannen sie weitere Erkundungstauchgänge durchzuführen, wobei der längste, welcher wiederum über fünf Stunden dauerte, weitere 2800m in die schier unendliche Höhle führte. Dadurch erhöhte sich die Gesamt-Eindringtiefe bei diesem Unternehmen auf 8825m.

Nach einer weiteren Nacht im Basiscamp kehrten sie nach mehr als 50 Stunden wieder an die Oberfläche zurück.

British-led dive team break record with 8.8km cave dive                    

 A British-led team of divers have surfaced after diving a world record-breaking 8.8km (5.5 miles) into the unexplored Pozo Azul cave system in Spain.

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Drag: Rene Houben is pulled through the midnight murk of sump two, a 5km (three-mile) underwater tunnel, on a ‘scooter’ propulsion unit to conserve energy (Pictures: Martyn Farr/Barcroft)

Explorers Jason Mallinson, Rick Stanton and John Volanthen, along with Dutch caver Rene Houben, charted new territory in a 50-hour voyage which saw them spend two nights camped deep underground.

‘It’s an incredible buzz to explore further than anyone has been ever before,’ said Mr Mallinson, from Huddersfield. ‘There was no wildlife down there, just a tunnel of crystal blue clear water stretching on and on.’

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Checks: Mr Houben prepares his scooter for another ride into the deep

The team could only go as far as their safety line would allow before they had to turn back.

Mr Mallinson, 43, added: ‘The adrenaline builds when you realise you are looking at something nobody has ever seen before. It’s that which drives you forward.

‘You don’t get scared. But you are permanently conscious of your equipment. If the slightest thing goes wrong then you are in a position where you might never be coming back.’

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Triumphant: Rick Stanton, Rene Houben, John Volanthen and Jason Mallinson emerge into the sunlight as record-holders on Monday

The team began their two-and-a-half day foray into the Pozo Azul caves in Covenera, northern Spain, on Saturday. They used ‘scooters’ to pull them through three sumps – or underwater passages.

After sump two they emerged in a small dry cave area nicknamed Tipperary. It was there they spent two nights resting and replenishing their underwater breathing mixtures.

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Base camp: Jason Mallinson (front) and the group prepare their gear

Measuring equipment told them exactly how much time they had bef­ore they used up the oxy­gen in the chamber.

They beat the 7.8km (4.8-mile) world record for the longest cave dive penetration, set last year at Wakulla Springs in Florida.

Support diver Martyn Farr, 59, said: ‘This explor­ation is akin to the first conquest of Mount Everest in 1953.’

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Jaws: Support diver Rob Dalby from Huddersfield carries equipment down through the cave opening

Tags:

Freitag, September 17th, 2010 Höhlen (caves) 4 Comments

Höhlentauchen in der Dominikanischen Republik / Cave dive the Dominican Republic

Merkwürdig wie die Dinge manchmal so laufen.

Man schreibt was über´s Höhlentauchen in Cuba und kommt mit einem Taucher in Kontakt, der ebenfalls an dem Land interessiert ist.

Nach ein paar emails, Telefonaten und umfangreichen Datenaustausch ist klar, wir sind auf einer Wellenlänge.

Zufällig ergibt sich dass Phillip Lehman, der in der Dominikanischen Republik lebt, dort als Mitglied der Dominican Republic Speleological Society umfangreiche Höhlensysteme erkundet und auch kartographiert.

Leider fehlt in seinem Team bis jetzt noch ein Unterwasserfotograf, um die ganze Schönheit der Höhlen zu dokumentieren. Naja, ich hab so das Gefühl, es bahnt sich eine fruchtbare Zusammenrbeit an, für Cuba und für die Dom Rep….

Hier ein kurzer Bericht von Phillip über welche Zufälle man eine neue Höhle entdecken kann.

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Funny how things sometimes work out.

You write something about cavediving in Cuba and by this get in contact with another diver who´s interested in the country too.

A couple of emails and phonecalls later you find out that you´re talking the same language. Sharing is the word, not hiding informations and keeping them to yourself. That´s what we did and it turned out that Phillip Lehman, who is living in the Dominican Republic, is a member of the Dominican Republic Speleolocical Society and by this is exploring the Dom Rep´s extensive cave systems.

All they need for some future projects is an underwater photographer to get pics for a better documentation of the beautiful cave systems they are exploring.

Somehow I have the feeling, this is the beginning of a very productive coorparation, concerning Cuba and the Dominican Republic.

This is a short story from Phillip about funny things leading to find a new cave.

Cueva El Arbol the discovery
Dominican Republic 8/11/2008
by Phillip Lehman

We were hanging out at Playa Diamante after a fine day of cave diving at El Dudu and we meet a few Christian missionaries on the beach.They talk to me about Jesus I talk to them about caves.
Funny how coincidences work, had I not talked about caves they would have never have told me that it so happens they were in a really cool water filled cave an hour earlier. After a flurry of questions they explain to us were it is and what it looked like, Thomas and I are tripping out as we have never heard of this cave and incredibly it’s only a kilometer or so on the road just before El Dudu, a cave we have dove numerous times.
We shake hands and thank them profusely for the information, cool guys, get in the car and drive to the cave in question.
They had told us that there is a small group of houses on the right side, there is an old man who sells lemons in the front yard and that the cave is in the field directly in front. After driving past the old man a few times we finally understand where to stop.

The sink is below this tree

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I ask him if there’s a cave here, he asks me if I have rum, I tell him show me the cave I will bring you a bottle next time, he agrees.
At this point a few really funny looking locals come out of the bushes, the old man signals them to take us to the cave they seem to have no concept of volume and they grunt and scream at me to follow them across the field, I realize they are deaf.
One of the guys has a cotton cap and pair of ski goggles on his forehead he looks like a Dominican version of Luke Skywalker in the empire strikes back, the situations you get into looking for caves.
I get in my surf shorts grab a mask and light and follow Luke across the field to a really big tree with a very large sinkhole underneath, I cannot believe we drove in front of this sink so many times and never even noticed it.

The Tree-Cave Crew from Left to Right

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Luke’s assistant, the kid who later shows us the swamp cave, me green shirt, landowner who wants rum, kneeling man who also wants rum, far right from the back Luke Skywalker.

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photos Bettina Balmer
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As I start to climb down Luke Skywalker starts screaming at me, at first I have no idea why, so I stop, he makes various hand signals and illustrates them with various sound effects, I still have no idea what he means and then I see it, directly in front of me there is a huge wasp nest and I was going to walk right into it. His hand signals now make sense, this guy is cool, I give him the international holly shit hand signal and continue down.

At the bottom of the sink there is a beautiful pool of crystal clear water, I put on my mask and jump in, i swim around the sink and notice a tunnel that goes straight down along the far end of the sink. It looks like it goes and I try to free dive as deep as possible to see more, I swim down to where the tunnel appears to level off at about 6-8 meters and I see a breakdown room with what looks like tight but going cave.
I am super psyched, I swim around and i see a few side tunnels but I cannot safely free dive those.

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zee entrance photo Bettina Balmer
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I get out of the water and using only hand signals and useless sound effects attempt to describe what I saw and that I need to go back to the car and get the tanks.

I climb back out go back to the car and I let Thomas know what I saw, we feel lazy and by now it has been the end of a full day of diving, we are both tired our tanks are empty so we decide to come back the
next day. We say goodbye in hand signals and try to explain that we will be back tomorrow.

Cueva El Arbole
8/11/2008 first dive

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Phillip Lehman

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Thomas Riffaud

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By now it’s already the afternoon and we have been power snorkeling the cave and see potential so we plan a proper dive. We get the gear ready on the side of the road, Luke helps us carry our stuff down and we kit up. Thomas ties in on a rock just above the surface and we swim down to where I saw the possible going cave, we get to the bottom and there is a really tight space between to collapsed boulders, Thomas goes in first and I follow, after a slight fight with some rocks and boulders I emerge on the other side, the cave gets a bit bigger and looks very different than other caves in the area.

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There are no decorations and the rock is a very sponge-like dark yellow color, very eroded and ancient looking. we swim further in and the tunnels stay kind of low but very wide, I see many side tunnels that have potential, the silt is dark brown and the water is so far crystal clear.

I turn around to see if the cave is percolating and it’s not that bad, cool. The cave so far seems to have one main tunnel with side tunnels branching off now and then, there is still no decorations and it is now becoming hard to make solid tie offs as the cave floor is now large silt banks with almost no rocks and the walls have very little rock protrusions. After a while the cave gets very wide but the ceiling starts to get lower, Thomas finds a good spot and makes a solid tie off.

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photo ©Lisa Roze

We swim further in and a few moments later the reel runs out, the ceiling is getting lower and it is starting to silt out a bit, Thomas ties in a new reel and the cave is now silting out even more, but we swim further in.
I am in the back and after a few more minutes I cannot see a thing, I know the celling is very low now I can feel the silt floor, I don’t really care, I figure Thomas can see and the cave keeps going, all is going well, and then I feel a pull and I am caught in the line.

I stop and slowly feel were the line goes and it’s caught under the light canister latch, I try to slowing get it out but it wont move. I can feel that the line is wedged in real tight and i am really concerned that if I pull it out too hard it might get cut, not an option, Thomas is somewhere out front laying line, this sucks! I try a few more times to get slowly get the line out and it finally does.

I start to swim in further and I pray the that cave keeps going, suddenly the viz clears up a bit and the ceiling gets a bit higher by a few feet, it’s a small upwards dip in the ceiling, after about ten meters the dip goes back down and the cave gets really low again, at that point Thomas emerges reeling in from an opaque red silt cloud, he makes a tie off on the only rock available under the slightly high ceiling and we turn.

The way out for the entire low bedding plane is zero viz, like I can’t see even my light, zero. I notice that the cave makes a lot of noise, I have always thought it’s a weird feature of caves, some section make a lot of noise other sections are quiet, the bubbles hit the celling in different ways. It’s something you really appreciate in silt outs, you can hear what the cave looks like, I love when that happens.

On the way out I explore a few side tunnels but they all choke out, I feel it’s enough for today and call the dive. We pause for a safety stop and poke around the edges of the entrance pool, I notice a way around the collapse pile that goes around the circumference of the sink. We both surface and Thomas gets out and goes back out to the car, i tie in a go for a quick look at.

The side passage, goes around the entire edge of the sink, there is really thick mung on the bottom and about 20 meters in it comes back out into another side of the sink on the opposite side of the debris slope, the ceiling is low about three feet and there are small cute furry bats everywhere, I like bats, bats are cool, I swim on the surface to the far end of the cavern to look for leads but it chokes out.
I pause at the far end to enjoy a few moments of bat watching, they remind me of my pitbull Jessica

Dive time: 56 minutes
Max depth: 14.2 meters
Fun factor: 8.3 (out of a possible 10)

I swim back to the entrance and climb out of the cave, Thomas is by the car smoking a cigarette. He spoke to a kid who knows of a cool possible cave and let’s me know the kid will be right back in ten Dominican minutes.

We wait ten Dominican minutes and eventualy the kid comes back and agrees to show us the cave.

What a coincidence it just so happens to be fifteen minutes or so past the tree cave, I confirm with the kid what kind of minutes these are, regular minutes he says, OK cool, I hope. I get changed and Thomas and I follow the kid into the field and past the tree cave

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Freitag, August 6th, 2010 Höhlen (caves) 21 Comments

Cuba-Cave-Exploration

Cuba-Cave-Exploration

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